FAQs

  • The National Aboriginal Role Model Program highlights the accomplishments of ordinary First Nations, Métis and Inuit youth.
  • The theme of the National Aboriginal Role Model Program is “Lead Your Way!”.
  • The program inspires youth to achieve their goals and encourages them to make healthy and positive choices.
  • Each year 12 Aboriginal youth serve as role models for their peers. The role models travel to First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities to attend local events and celebrations and to speak to youth about making positive and healthy choices.
  • The 2004 national spokesperson for the program was Jordin Tootoo. He is a role model for many Aboriginal youth across Canada. Tootoo is the first Inuk person to play in the NHL.
  • The program is run by the National Aboriginal Health Organization.

  • The National Aboriginal Health Organization works to improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal Peoples by providing them with useful health information and research.
  • It works to promote health and well-being to First Nations, Inuit and Métis living in urban, rural and remote areas.
  • The organization has three centres: the First Nations Centre, Inuit Tuttarvingat and Métis Centre. Each works on its group’s unique health issues.
  • The National Aboriginal Health Organization and its three centres promote Aboriginal health issues. They do this through publications, policy and research materials, its website, presentations, forums, and public education activities.

  • Each of the role models is an accomplished youth in his or her community. They have been recognized for their achievements in volunteering, school, sports, business, or for their commitment to their unique cultures. They have set goals for themselves and have worked hard to achieve them. Some have overcome difficult times. They all have had a positive influence on their peers and their community.
  • The role models are First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth. They are between the ages of 13 and 30 years.
  • The role models come from different regions across Canada.
  • A list of the Aboriginal role models and a short biography of each is available under “Role Model Profiles” section of this website.

  • The role models were nominated by Aboriginal youth between the ages of 13 and 30 in their communities.
  • A selection committee, made up of past role models, select the new 12 role models from the group of nominees.
  • There is a set of criteria to rate the role model nominees that the selection committee uses.
  • Based on the information provided on the nomination forms, the selection committee then graded the nominees.
  • The nomination forms were divided into three groups: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. The selection committee then selected the top Inuit, First Nations and Métis youth.
  • Once the grading is completed, the results are tallied and the top role models are chosen.

  • One of the goals of the National Aboriginal Role Model Program is to celebrate the accomplishments of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis youth. They are role models to all Aboriginal youth, regardless of their ancestry.
  • From the beginning, the Youth Working Group agreed it was important to choose role models based on their life experiences, not just on their Aboriginal descent.
  • All three groups of Aboriginal youth are represented in the role models.

  • If required information is missing from the nomination forms, NARMP staff contact the nominator to complete the form. These completed forms were then considered valid.
  • The invalid forms are invalid because either the nominator or the nominee was not between the ages of 13 and 30 years old.

  • It may simply be a matter of the population size. There are more First Nations people in Canada than there are Inuit or Métis.
  • Based on the population size of First Nations, we expected to receive more nominations for First Nations youth.
  • NAHO encouraged all Aboriginal groups to nominate their role models.
  • We place ads in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis newspapers. We send public service announcements to Aboriginal radio stations. We also send community call packages to education directors, community offices and Aboriginal organizations in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities.

  • No, Jordin Tootoo was the spokesperson for the National Aboriginal Role Model Program in 2004. His role was to promote the program and encourage youth to nominate their role models.
  • He was not part of the Youth Working Group that selected the first set of role models.

  • The role model program has existed since 1984. It was originally called the National Native Role Model Program. Different Aboriginal organizations and communities have run it throughout the years.
  • The program is funded through the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Health Canada.
  • In late 2002, Health Canada decided it wanted to see the program redesigned so that it included more input from First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth.
  • NAHO submitted a proposal to redesign the role model program. NAHO saw the role model program as an opportunity to encourage First Nations, Inuit, and Métis in their pursuit of healthy living.
  • NAHO has run the program for the last seven years.

  • The newly redesigned National Aboriginal Role Model Program is more national in scope than before. NAHO plans to include Aboriginal youth from urban, rural, and remote regions of Canada.
  • In 2001, an evaluation of the role model indicated the program was not reaching youth living in remote or northern areas.
  • NAHO has sent community call packages to urban, rural, and remote schools and communities. Its goal is to get nominations from around the country. The youth on the Working Group represent regions from across the country.
  • The 2001 evaluation of the role model program pointed out that it focused more on First Nations youth, rather than on all three groups.
  • The newly redesigned program involves increased input from all three Aboriginal groups: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis.
  • The role models will visit First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities.

  • Funding comes from the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Health Canada to redesign and implement the National Aboriginal Role Model Program.
  • Funding will cover the design and distribution of posters and trading cards of each of the 12 role models, design and distribution of the community call packages and role model visits to Aboriginal communities.

  • The National Aboriginal Role Model Program is an ideal project for the National Aboriginal Health Organization.
  • The National Aboriginal Health Organization and the National Aboriginal Role Model Program share the same goal: to promote health and healthy living among Aboriginal Peoples.
  • The National Aboriginal Health Organization’s objective is to encourage First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people to pursue healthy living. It also encourages them to choose careers in the health field.
  • The National Aboriginal Role Model Program is a great way to encourage Aboriginal people in these pursuits.
  • This program fits with the National Aboriginal Health Organization’s mandate to facilitate and promote research. NAHO will conduct research and an environmental scan to identify all provincial/territorial and local role model activities and to identify key events and best practices of role model programs.

  • All young people should have someone they look up to, someone to inspire them to reach their goals.

  • Aboriginal youth have been part of the role model program from the very beginning.
  • From the start, NAHO wanted to ensure this was a by-youth-for-youth program.
  • NAHO set up a Youth Working Group to help design and plan the role model program.
  • The Youth Working Group is made of 12 Aboriginal youth from several national Aboriginal organizations and Aboriginal youth councils.
  • Aboriginal youth from various parts of the country were involved in focus testing on the design and content of promotional materials, including the posters and trading cards.
  • The Youth Working Group developed the criteria for selecting the role models and actually choose the first 12 role models.

  • Role models will visit Aboriginal communities to share their stories and messages with youth.
  • They will try to inspire other young people to set goals and work towards achieving them.
  • They will also encourage youth to make positive and healthy choices that will help improve their lives and their communities.
  • Role models will attend events that celebrate the success of people in the community and visit schools to speak to youth about their experiences.

  • When the “Lead Your Way!”” program was launched, NAHO encouraged communities to submit a request to have a role model visit.
  • Each month, the role models visit Aboriginal communities, events and conferences.
  • Role models’ scheduled visits are posted on under “Community Visits”. Here you can view upcoming and past visits.
  • Community members are encouraged to continue to invite role models to their events.