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About

Vision:

The National Aboriginal Health Organization is a knowledge based organization that excels in the advancement and promotion of health and well-being of all  First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals, families and communities.

Mission:

The National Aboriginal Health Organization advances and promotes the health and well-being of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis through collaborative research, Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, building capacity, and community led initiatives.

Officially incorporated in March 2000 as the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal Peoples Health (OAAPH), the Board of Directors approved the name of  the organization as the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) in December 2000.

NAHO is a national not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual health of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals, families and communities. It is our fundamental belief that the advancement, promotion and sharing of knowledge regarding the health and well being of our Peoples are keys to empowerment.

NAHO is unique because it is the only national Aboriginal controlled organization in Canada that is set up with three population specific Centres dedicated to advance and promote the distinct needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations through knowledge-based initiatives.

Goals:

  1. Conduct, improve and promote research to enhance the health and well-being of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
  2. Increase understanding and awareness of the health and well-being of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
  3. Facilitate and promote research, and develop relationships relating to First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
  4. Support and promote First Nations, Inuit and Métis pursuing Traditional and Western based health related careers.
  5. Support the recognition, preservation and promotion of First Nations, Inuit and Métis in their transmission of Traditional Knowledge, healing practices and medicine.
  6. Provide First Nations, Inuit and Métis with the tools to promote environmental health.

NAHO is respectful and inclusive of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations including men, women, children, youth, and the elderly, living in urban and rural locations.

NAHO is governed by a Board of Directors made up of 13 directors (one outgoing), 8 of which are appointed by NAHO’s member organizations:

An additional four board members are elected by the 8 appointed board members.

NAHO receives core funding from Health Canada to undertake knowledge-based activities, including education, research and knowledge dissemination. Health Canada exerts no influence over the content of NAHO materials nor are NAHO materials attributable, in whole or in part, to Health Canada. No corporate body or commercial entity has any influence over the contents of NAHO publications.

All materials published by NAHO are put through an established approvals process to ensure that the information presented is credible, timely and accurate. Many of NAHO’s publications, such as the Journal of Aboriginal Health, are peer-reviewed prior to being accepted for publication by the organization. With regards to Aboriginal knowledge, NAHO adheres to the principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (OCAP).

NAHO’s centres

NAHO’s work is strengthened by its three centres: the First Nations Centre, the Inuit Tuttarvingat and the Métis Centre. Each of these centres advances the health and well-being of First Nations, Inuit and Métis by focusing on the distinct needs of their respective populations and promoting culturally relevant approaches to health care.